Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments

Hi there! Felt is one of my favorite crafting supplies because it’s perfect for beginners and super easy to work with. Let’s learn how to make these easy felt Christmas ornaments to brighten up your tree!

Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments

I kept these very simple, and did a style resembling classic Scandinavian ornaments. My kids thought they looked exactly like Christmas cookies with sprinkles, so that works too! You can make these way more complicated and fancy as your skills allow, so think of this tutorial like a jumping off point. Let’s get started!

Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments

Also check out our printable Christmas Nativity set.

Supplies:

  • Felt
  • Cookie cutters or stencils
  • Embroidery thread
  • Needle
  • Seed beads, pearls, or other beads
  • Scissors
  • Pencil or marker (I recommend sharpie, as flair pens smear on felt)
  • Fiber fill or scrap fabric for stuffing

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Start by using your marker to trace the cookie cutter shape onto your felt. You’ll need two pieces per ornaments. I made stars, holly leaves, and a candy cane. When they’re all traced, cut our your shapes just inside the marker line. I’m going to show you how I made the holly ornament, but they’re all made the same way.

Get your beads ready to work with. Scrap pieces of felt are great work surfaces to hold beads that like to roll! Then I cut a long piece of embroidery thread. Embroidery thread is made of six strands, so I like separate it into two separate pieces of three strands each. This is easier to thread through the needle and easier to work with through thick felt. Thread your needle and knot the end. Starting at the back of one of your felt pieces, bring the needle up through the felt. Add a bead onto the needle, and let it slide all the way down the thread.

Insert your needle back into the felt just a tiny bit from where the thread came out, and pull it through. That’s one bead added! Now come back up through the felt in a different spot, and keep adding beads until you’re happy with how it looks.

When you’re all done, tie the thread off at the back. If you want, you can add beads to the other piece of felt so there are beads on both sides of your ornament, but I kept mine to only the side you’ll see when it’s hung up. Then I sandwiched the other piece of felt to the back of the beaded piece. Starting the stitching in between the pieces, go ahead and blanket stitch (or whip stitch if your prefer) around the edges of your felt.

Basic embroidery blanket stitch

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Keeping the thread attached, leave about an inch of space unsewn so we can fill the ornament. I stuffed mine with a little bit of fiber fill, but you can use scrap fabric or even cotton balls! Then finish stitching it closed and knot it off.

To add a hanger to the ornament, thread about 4-5 inches of embroidery thread onto your needle. Push it through the top of the ornament about a 1/4 inch from the edge, and pull the thread through. Remove the needle, even up the ends, and tie them in a knot. Tada! A built in ribbon for your ornament, that matches perfectly. If you want the knot hidden, just slide it around to the back of the ornament.

Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments

Now all you need to do is make more! This is a great project for a snowy day while watching a favorite show.

Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments

I hope you enjoy making your own Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments!

Easy Felt Christmas Ornaments

I just love how warm and cozy they look on the tree at night. Do you love making homemade ornaments? Check out our Easy Snowflake Ornament Craft too! I hope you all have a lovely holiday season!

You might also like these beautifully diverse printable paper Christmas angels.

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About the author

I'm a wife and mom of 3 kids, a blogger, beauty vlogger, graphic designer, and jill of all trades.

View all articles by Joanna Brooks

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