Chinese New Year Paper Fortune Cookies

Chinese New Year Paper Fortune Cookies

Hi everyone! Chinese New Year is coming up soon, so let’s learn how to make these fun Paper Fortune Cookies! While fortune cookies are not traditionally Chinese (they were actually invented in the United States!) they are a very recognizable symbol for most American children who aren’t familiar with tradition Chinese New Year customs like lucky envelopes. These can be made from any thin paper like scrapbook, origami, or construction paper. Here’s what you’ll need!

You might also like our Chinese New Year Activities and Printables for Kids!

Chinese New Year Paper Fortune Cookies

Supplies:

  • Colored or patterned scrapbook, construction, or origami paper.
  • White copy or construction paper.
  • A 4-5 inch round object like a small bowl or lid.
  • Hot glue gun.
  • Scissors.
  • Pencil.
  • Pen.

Place your round object down on your paper and trace a circle, then cut it out.

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Flip the circle over, add a dot of glue to the patterned side, and roll it up like shown. It should look like a cannoli. Now cut a thin, long rectangle out of your white paper.

And write your fortune on it. I wrote “The Year of the Pig will bring you great fortune.” Slide it into the cookie, and then turn the cookie so that the seam is on one side. Take the open edges, and bend them together. The center will crease and the cookie shape will form.

Add a dot of hot glue about an inch out from the center crease, and press the two halves together. And you’re done! Can you see the fortune inside? You can break the paper cookie open, or keep it looking pretty and just slide the fortune right out.

Now just go ahead and make a whole bunch! They look especially pretty in a big bowl as part of a centerpiece, or scattered around the table. Kids love coming up with fun fortunes to write!

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I'm a wife and mom of 3 kids, a blogger, beauty vlogger, graphic designer, and jill of all trades.

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