Spring Story Starters

Our new series of printable story starters are becoming increasingly popular with our readers. I’m thrilled because I always love finding a new subject to create worksheets for that I know you all will use. I’m always excited to provide content that is especially helpful to parents and educators.

Here are some of the ways you can use these story starters in your classroom or curriculum:

  • To practice paragraph formation and chunking related ideas together
  • To practice simple sentence structures
  • To foster creative writing and creative thinking
  • To engage students more in their writing because they are making this story their own
  • To challenge students to use weekly vocabulary words in context
  • To use as fill in activities when you need to work with small groups or rearrange your schedule for the day

So, what would your students or kids do if a candy tree unexpectedly bloomed this spring? Or if it rained raspberry juice from the sky? Or, what if spring didn’t come at all? With these spring writing prompts you can get a peek into their imaginations and see just where their minds go when given these crazy suggestions.

Related Pages: Spring Mad Libs, Spring Worksheets, Spring Kids Poems

Autumn has fallen leaves and crisp air, winter has snow and Christmas, and summer has swimming and sun. Spring, though, has a lot of awesome reminders of its own. There are tulips and daffodils poking out of the soil along with the other spring bulbs. Trees are beginning to bud with promise for the upcoming seasons. Baby animals are being born, the snow is melting away, and people are beginning to wake from our winter hibernation to enjoy the first peek of sunshine in awhile. Seriously, what’s not to love about spring?!

Check out all of the Woo! Jr. Spring kids activities right here!

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About the author

Founder and CEO of Woo! Jr. Kids Activities, Wendy loves creating crafts, activities and printables that help teachers educate and give parents creative ways to spend time with their children.

View all articles by Wendy Piersall

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